I don’t know if it was overconfidence, wishful thinking or both but I seem to have a number of patterns that are not the right size for me. Some of these date from my earlier sewing days when I would buy patterns fully believing I was going to make that item next week. These patterns don’t fit because I’m not the girl I was 20 years ago – read two sizes bigger. Another group of patterns are the ones bought optimistically in more recent sales, knowing they are wrong. Somewhere along the years, I slid from the 8-10-12 band into the 14-16-18 band. Now there would be wishful thinking “I might lose those pounds” and then there is the (perhaps) overconfidence “I can adjust that pattern”.

 

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Oh, those were the days.

 

Now that I’ve accepted that I probably won’t “lose those pounds” anytime soon, and I want to make these garments now, I have to follow the second route and adjust the patterns.

It can look a little daunting because commercial patterns, especially multisized ones have a lot of information on them and signs and symbols that can seem baffling. However, the multisize pattern is your friend as you can see how the system works.

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Straight edges are fine, you can just trace them but you will need to add your sizes by grading. Look at your pattern, big four ones like Vogue usually have three sizes on a sheet so look at how they increase them. There will be a small increment between each size e.g. 0.5cm or 3/8 inch.

measure
Use a clear ruler to measure your points

Measure and make a note of that increment and then add that amount for each additional size you need. Note: your size points should all fall on a straight line, this will help you check you are in the right place.

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Add on an increment for each additional size

Once you have marked your points, join them up using a ruler or French curve, or a flexible curve, which is my favourite because you can manipulate it to fit your line. If you are tracing onto a new sheet rather than just adding to the existing pattern, remember to copy all of the markings such as notches, grainline and placement marks.

 

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Curves and lines

Once done your pattern will be ready to use. I can now feel happy about those “bargains” I got in the sales and use my precious patterns to make some lovely garments. Have you got some mis-sized patterns lurking in your stash? Have a go at grading them to your size. Do you have any tips to share? I’d like to see how you get on.

 

One thought on “Making it work – upsizing commercial sewing patterns.

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